Sunday, April 20, 2014

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Silver Coins


Gold Spot: $1,285.90    Silver Spot: $19.35    Platinum Spot:$1,406.00    Palladium Spot: $790.00

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Shipping Cost Coins: $28.00 first, $1.00 each additional. Bars: $65.00 first, $5.00 each additional

Sales tax 8.75% for California residents when purchasing less than $1,500.00

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WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD! THATS OUR GUARANTEE! THE LOWEST PRICES IN THE INDUSTRY!
Gold American Eagle (1oz) $1,335.90
Gold Canadian Maple Leaf (1 oz) $1,319.90
Gold Krugerrand (1 oz) $1,328.90
Gold Austrian Phil (1 oz) $1,335.90
Buffalo Gold (1 oz) (UNC) $1,335.90
Gold Bar (1 oz)(UNC) $1,303.90
Gold Bar (10 oz)(UNC) $13,019.74
Swiss 20 Franc $249.68
French 20 Franc $249.68
British Sovereign $311.03
Austrian 1 Ducat $146.49
Austrian 4 Ducat $584.18
Panda Gold Coin (1oz) $1,337.34
Silver Canadian Maple Leaf (1oz) $21.28
Silver American Eagle (1 oz) $22.25
Silver Round (1 oz) $20.10

The $2.50 Liberty U.S. Gold Coin

This coin, designed by Christian Gobrecht was first minted in 1840. By 1850, only ten years later, all of America’s circulating gold coins featured this classic design. Few people collected coins in the 19th and early 20th Centuries and very few of these coins still exist in Mint State or Uncirculated Condition.
The $5 Liberty U.S. Gold Coin
The $5 Liberty Gold Half Eagle coin, was first minted in 1839 and continued in mintage until 1908. Mint State coins are rare because at that time $5 was a sizable sum of money and only a handful of visionary Americans could afford to save a $5 coin in pristine condition.
The $10 Liberty U.S. Gold Coin
The James Longacre design is slightly different from the Gobrecht design but similar enough to justify including all four coins in a Liberty set. The $10 coin contains .483 oz. of gold and was first minted in 1838. These coins made up the majority of America’s circulating coin even after the introduction of paper money at the beginning of the Civil War in 1861.
The $20 Liberty U.S. Gold Coin
The $20 gold coin shown here is the only known specimen of its kind and is among the rarest of United States coins. It owes its existence, in part, to the discovery of gold in California in 1848, of which the famous Sutter’s Mill discovery was but the beginning. The California Gold Rush created a steady flow of gold, part of which reached the United States Mint in Philadelphia. Instead of striking gold in traditional $10 pieces, the Mint decided to also issue larger denominations. In February 1849, Congress authorized the striking of $20 gold coins, which were created by the very talented Chief-Engraver James Barton Longacre. This coin is one of two trial patterns struck on March 12, 1850, even though it bears the date 1849. The second pattern has never been found. This coin inaugurated the series of gold 20 dollars, nicknamed “double eagles”, which were issued from 1850 to 1907. The term “double eagle” is derived from the fact that the $10 coin is called an “eagle”.
The $2.50 Indian U.S. Gold Coin (1908 to 1929)
The $2.50 Indian Gold Coin, minted from 1908 to the beginning of the Great Depression in 1929, has the distinction of being the first U.S. coin with an “incused” or sunken in” design. This coin, as the name implies, depicts a proud Indian Chief. Such an important part of our American heritage
The $5 Indian U.S. Gold Coin (1908 to 1929)
The $5 Indian gold coins, designed by Bela Lyon Pratt, minted from 1908 until 1929. The coin bears the image of a native American chieftain, the reverse shows an American Eagle, symbols for war and peace. The public initially feared the novelty of the recessed images of the coin. The reluctance of Americans to retain the coin for any extended period of time has had a lasting impact on the modern market for these coins, making it difficult to locate specimens in uncirculated condition. High gem grade $5 Indians are nearly impossible to find, and are valued at several thousand dollars apiece.
The $10 Indian U.S. Gold Coin (1908 to 1929)
The $10 Indian gold coins were minted from 1907 until 1933 and designed by the famous sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The $10 “Indian” became accepted and praised as perhaps the most exquisite coin design in US history. The coin was introduced in 1907, Americans were taken aback by the obverse of the coin, featuring Lady Liberty adorned in a full Indian war bonnet, and even further disgruntled by Theodore Roosevelt’s decision to exclude the motto “In God We Trust.” The public came to appreciate the “Indian” design, and in response to public outcry, the motto was added to the coins in 1908. The outer rim of the coin contained 42 stars, one representing each state in the union, until 1912 when the number was increased to 44 to recognize the addition of Arizona and New Mexico to the Union. An eagle is pictured on the reverse.
Saint Gaudens $20 Gold Coin
The $20 Saint Gaudens is one of two, one ounce (.9675) old US gold coins which are also referred to as a Double Eagle. Those coins minted from 1907 to 1911 have 46 stars across the top of the obverse side, each one representing a state of the union. In 1912 New Mexico and then Arizona became states and the number of stars increased to 48 from 1912 – 1933. 

The $20 Saint Gaudens was officially minted in the United States in 3 different mints, Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco. It was the last gold piece struck by the U.S. for regular issue and will forever be a symbol of what real money is!

Teddy Roosevelt personally selected the so-called “High Relief” Lady Liberty design. The obverse features the image of Lady Liberty striding confidently into the future, while the reverse features an American Eagle in flight. Unfortunately Saint-Gaudens died of cancer on August 3, 1907 without seeing his magnificent coin enter circulation.

In November of 1907, mintage of “regular issue” High Relief $20 Saint-Gaudens gold coins began. There were 11,250 coins minted but this was no easy task. Each coin required five blows from the press to raise the design relief. Bankers complained that these new coins wouldn’t stack properly because of their new design, and practicality winning over aesthetics, the coin design was altered by Charles Barber into a “flat relief” version. The first Barber-redesigned Saints were minted with 1907 & 1908 dates. Struck mostly in Philadelphia, $20 Saint-Gaudens gold coins were also produced at our Denver & San Francisco mints. The High Relief is coveted by collectors and investors and sells for thousands of dollars above the spot gold price. Today the $20 Saint Gaudens is one of the most sought after “collector coins” in the world!

Designer Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Gross Weight 33.436g
Gold Content 0.9675 Oz pure gold
Composition 0.900 gold, 0.100 copper
Diameter 34 mm, redid edge.
Dates of Mint Philadelphia 1907-1933
Denver 1908-1931
San Francisco 1908-1930
Buffalo
American Buffalo Gold Bullion Coins 

To meet the demand of investors who seek the purest investment gold possible, the US Mint has issued a 1-ounce .9999 fine (24 Karat) legal tender $50 gold bullion coin based on the classic 1913 “buffalo nickel” designed by the world famous sculptor James Earle Fraser. The obverse features the classic profile of a Native American. The reverse features a majestic buffalo.

The Design

The 1913-1938 “Indian Head” nickel, with the buffalo reverse, is an essential bit of American nostalgia and history. Designed by the American master sculptor James Earle Fraser, it is just one of many enduring images he created.

Coin Face* Diameter Thickness Purity
1 Troy Oz $50.00 32.7 mm 2.946 mm 0.9999
American Gold Eagle
The American Gold Eagle is an official gold bullion coin of the United States. Authorized under the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985, it was first released by the United States Mint in 1986. Offered in 1/10 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/2 oz, and 1 oz denominations, these coins are guaranteed by the U.S. government to contain the stated amount of actual gold weight in troy ounces. By law, the gold must come from sources in America, with an additional alloy of silver and copper to produce a more wear-resistant coin of .9167 (22 karat, which had long been the crown gold English standard for gold coins). It is authorized by the United States Congress and is backed by the United States Mint for weight and content. 

The obverse design features a rendition of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s full length figure of Lady Liberty with flowing hair, holding a torch in her right hand and an olive branch in her left, with the Capitol building in the left background. The reverse design, by sculptor Miley Busiek, features a male eagle carrying an olive branch flying above a nest containing a female eagle and her hatchlings.

Diameter 32.70 mm
Thickness 2.87 mmg
Gross Weight 1.0909 Troy Oz (33.930 g)
Face Value $50
The Double Eagle
The $20 gold coin shown here is the only known specimen of its kind and is among the rarest of United States coins. It owes its existence, in part, to the discovery of gold in California in 1848, of which the famous Sutter’s Mill discovery was but the beginning. The California Gold Rush created a steady flow of gold, part of which reached the United States Mint in Philadelphia. Instead of striking gold in traditional $10 pieces, the Mint decided to also issue larger denominations. In February 1849, Congress authorized the striking of $20 gold coins, which were created by the very talented Chief-Engraver James Barton Longacre. This coin is one of two trial patterns struck on March 12, 1850, even though it bears the date 1849. The second pattern has never been found. This coin inaugurated the series of gold 20 dollars, nicknamed “double eagles”, which were issued from 1850 to 1907. The term “double eagle” is derived from the fact that the $10 coin is called an “eagle”.
Sovereigns
British Sovereign Gold Coins 

British Sovereign gold bullion coins are nickel-size gold bullion coins that were struck worldwide at the height of the British Empire.

First introduced in 1816, the British Sovereign gold coin came to be the world’s most widely distributed gold coin, a distribution which grew along with the British Empire to be minted in Pretoria, Bombay, Ottawa, Melbourne, Perth, and Sydney. Hundreds of millions of Sovereigns were struck at their peak of distribution in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

A large supply of gold Sovereigns and continued hoarding and trade all over the world cause these nickel-sized gold coins to be available today at bullion pricing. These coins portray the reigning monarch (sovereign, hence the name) on one side, and Pestrucci’s St. George slaying the Dragon on the other.

Gold Content 0.2354 troy ounce
Diameter 22.05 mm
Thickness 1.52 mm
Purity 0.917
Total Weight 0.2568 troy ounce
Philharmonics
The Vienna Philharmonic 

Backed by the government of Austria and minted by the Austrian Mint in Vienna, the Vienna Philharmonic is a widely owned gold bullion coin.

Background of Vienna Philharmonics

Minted at the historic Austrian Mint in Vienna, internationally famous for producing exceptional gold coins for more than 800 years, the Philharmonic is one of the most gorgeous and coveted of all modern gold bullion coins. The world’s best selling Gold coin in 1992, 1995, 1996 is the Philharmonic Struck in 999.9 purity of fine gold.

The world famous Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra is the inspiration for this coin. The harmonious design of musical instruments from the Orchestra, adorn the reverse side of the coin. The great organ in the Golden Hall in Vienna’s Musikverein is pictured on the obverse side of the coin. Also featured on this side are the weight, fineness and year of issue. Face value is indicated in Austrian Schilling in minting prior to December 31, 2001 and Euro afterwards.

Sizes Available 1 Troy Oz
Krugerrand
South African Krugerrand Gold Bullion Coins 

The Krugerrand from South Africa, first minted in 1967, was the first gold coin to contain precisely one ounce of fine gold and intended as created to provide a vehicle for the private ownership of gold. By bestowing legal tender status upon the coin, Krugerrands could be owned by citizens of the United States, who at that time were prohibited private ownership of bullion, but allowed ownership of foreign coins.

Since inception, the Krugerrand has become the most widely owned bullion coin in the world with over 46 million ounces in circulation. The Krugerrand gets its name from Paul Kruger, featured on the obverse, president of the old South African Republic. The reverse depicts a springbok, one of the national symbols of South Africa. The name “South Africa” and the gold content are shown in both Afrikaans and English.

The success of the Krugerrand led to other gold producing nations minting their own bullion coins, including the Canadian Maple Leaf in 1979 and the American Eagle in 1986.

Coin Diameter Thickness Purity
1 Troy Oz 32.6 mm 2.75 mm 0.917
1/2 Troy Oz 27.0 mm 2.24 mm 0.917
1/4 Troy Oz 22.0 mm 1.83 mm 0.917
1/10 Troy Oz 16.5 mm 1.19 mm 0.917
Coin given in gold content (actual weight higher).
Maple Leaf
Canadian Maple Leaf Gold Bullion Coins
Royal Canadian Mint Retooling
 

The Royal Canadian Mint has currently rationed its gold Maple Leaf coin production. As an authorized retailer of these products, we are currently filling back orders with our limited rations. We estimate that any new orders you place will ship in 12-14 weeks, but you can be confident that all trades locked in will be shipped expeditiously as we receive supply of product from the Royal Canadian Mint. For those of you who wish to ensure a place in the queue, we will continue to lock in trades at our low premiums over spot.

Guaranteed by the Government of Canada and traded in world markets since 1979, gold Canadian Maple Leaf coins have become some of the most desirable bullion coins in the world today. Available in four sizes of, one-ounce, half-ounce, quarter-ounce and one-tenth ounce, all are beautifully struck with a gold purity of .9999. As a government issued gold bullion coin, it was the second to become available, after the South African Krugerrand.

Coin Face* Diameter Thickness Purity
1 Troy Oz $50.00 30mm 2.78mm 0.9999
1/2 Troy Oz $20.00 25mm 2.20mm 0.9999
1/4 Troy Oz $10.00 20mm 1.78mm 0.9999
1/10 Troy Oz $5.00 16mm 1.13mm 0..9999
1/20 Troy Oz $1.00 14mm 0.92mm 0..9999
*Face value is in Canadian Dollars.
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